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6 of the Best Design-Led Hotels in the World

The rise of the design-led hotel: it’s a trend we wholeheartedly welcome.

Boutique. Eclectic. Striking. Awe-inspiring. However you want to describe them, design-led hotels are giving travellers around the world the option to slip it up a few gears, to luxury.

Scouring every corner of the globe, we’re going to lead you on an envy-inducing, design-inspiring journey that’s going to have you digging out your suitcase faster than you can say ‘paradise’.

THE HOXTON, PARIS

This little 18th-century delight was once the residence of Etienne Rivie, the advisor to Louis XV. The striking galleried lobby and summer-infused courtyard terrace were given the design flair of the Soho House team, while Humbert and Poyet worked on the rooms.

The bedrooms themselves are to die for, with bespoke chevron timber floors, elegant cornicing and bold feature walls. The unusual aesthetic decor mix of Art Deco with floral patterns and vintage ornaments, lends an undeniable hipster vibe, which is welcome and highly instagrammable.

 

BISATE LODGE, RWANDA

Set in northern Rwanda, the glorious Bisate Lodge simply ups the tempo on luxury accommodation that’s connected with nature. It’s an eight-bedroom rooftop resort, nestled in a natural amphitheatre that was formed by a long-time dormant volcano.

If that wasn’t enough, each ‘forest’ room looks out over the Virunga Mountains, which are home to many a mountain gorilla. The lodge offers thatched pods which mirror traditional Rwandan design with domed roofs and materials such as wood and volcanic stone.

THE STRATFORD, LONDON


Modern luxury in East London? Tick! Well, how about a six floor design-led hotel by SPACE Copenhagen, the design duo behind legendary NOMA. Expect a fusion of Scandinavian style with old world opulence, pastel tones and breathtakingly beautiful stone bathrooms.

For the bedrooms, just think Scandinavian but multiply by ten thousand - the bedrooms offer floor to ceiling natural daylight, spacious desks and walk-in showers. Opens in May 2019.

THE WAREHOUSE HOTEL, SINGAPORE

Its history as a spice warehouse in 1895 isn’t evident in today’s design beauty, which is a far cry from resembling anything lacklustre.

The 37 room boutique hotel was jointly designed by Zarch Collaborative Architects and design studio, Asylum, to give it character in spades. With a focus on local talent, even the in-room cups and saucers are made by a local ceramic studio. Also, think large vault ceilings, exposed brickwork and earthy tones with a little head tilt to its industrial past.

L’HOTEL MARRAKECH, MOROCCO

This aesthetic gem, set in the heart of the Medina, is the first foray into hospitality by none other than Jasper Conran, the celebrated fashion designer.

The hotel is a converted 19th-century palace with only five masterfully designed, spacious suites. Each has its own private balcony that overlooks an impressive courtyard, with an impeccably tiled fountain and swimming pool.

It’s rooted in fine taste, with traditional local crafts alongside antique furniture and even Conran’s personal art collection making appearances throughout the building. It’s obvious that there’s an edge of 1940s elegance, but the clear individualized style of Conran’s adds a deliciously modern twist. And the stunning views across the Atlas Mountains don’t hurt either.

SOHO HOUSE, BARCELONA

It doesn’t get much more authentically impressive than Soho House, set in the creative streets of Barcelona’s Gothic Quarter. It’s a members club (also open to non-members) and is spread across 6 floors of a dreamlike interior design culmination.

Earthy colours meet Mediterranean mosaics, patterned rugs and textiles meet exposed brick, and country-house style meets the rooftop pool...it simply doesn’t get any better.

So if you want this year’s vacation to be a visual spectacle, close your eyes and point a finger anywhere at this page.

Wherever you land, we don’t think you’ll be disappointed.

image sources - hoxton paris, andbeyond, the stratford, l'hotel marrakech, soho house